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Apple agrees to cough up for $15 billion Irish tax bill

06 December 2017

Apple filed an appeal against the Commission's ruling in December 2016, and the company accused outspoken EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager of using Apple as a "convenient target" to make headlines. He added that the Government expects that "the money will begin to be transmitted into the account from Apple across the first quarter of next year". The Commission ordered Ireland to collect back taxes for the years 2003-2014, which it estimated to be as much 13 billion euros plus interest.

Apple has agreed to pay Ireland up to €13bn (£11.5bn) in back taxes after the European Commission said it received unfair tax incentives.

While in Brussels to "update" Vestager on the agreement, Donohoe said Ireland was still contesting the Commission's ruling, but would be "complying with our obligations in terms of collecting the money from Apple".

The ruling stated that tax benefits received by the tech company were illegal under European Union rules, because they allowed Apple to pay substantially less tax than other businesses.

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The EU ruling that Ireland offered illegal state aid to Apple, and must recover €13B ($15B) in underpaid taxes, marked the end of a long-running investigation - but not the end of the dispute ...

Both Apple and Ireland dragged their feet on the repayment as they appealed the decision in court.

The $15,4 billion will start flowing into Irish coffers in Q1 2018, but Apple continues to deny any wrongdoing.

In a statement, Apple said that it remains confident the court will overturn the commission's decision once it has reviewed the evidence.

Apple agrees to cough up for $15 billion Irish tax bill