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Hate crimes overall climb 4.6 percent

14 November 2017

Wisconsin's 2016 figures were reported by 18 — or roughly 4 percent — of a total of 414 agencies participating in the program statewide.

Federal Bureau of Investigation data show hate crimes increased across the country from 5,850 in 2015 to 6,121 crimes in 2016.

According to the Huffington Post digital portal, these data show that for the first time in a decade the country experienced consecutive annual increases in the number of crimes of that nature.

Hate crimes in Wisconsin appeared to decrease for the second straight year in 2016.

In 2015, 32 crimes were motivated by race, five by religion, and seven by sexual orientation.

There were also 105 incidents against transgender people, a 44 percent increase compared to 2015.

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A report released Monday says there were more than 6,100 hate crimes a year ago. The remaining incidents were perpetrated at a variety of other locations, including schools and houses of worship, commercial and government buildings, restaurants and nightclubs, parking lots and garages, playgrounds and parks, and even medical facilities.

The FBI's hate crime statistics lag by about a year and widely believed to underreport the extent of hate crimes in America.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the task force he appointed on crime reduction is exploring ways to revise training for police and prosecutors, and to improve data collection on hate crimes. Hate incidents increased from 203 in 2015 to 285 in 2016. Crimes motivated by bias against Protestants and Eastern Orthodox Christians both declined.

Anti-Jewish bias was the motivation cited in a little more than half of the 1,273 religion-related hate crimes.

Dozens of cities with more than 100,000 residents either reported zero hate crimes or did not submit their hate crime data, according toananalysis by the Anti-Defamation League, a civil rights organization, which has called for better reporting.

Another 21.0 percent were for religion, and 17.7 percent sexual orientation.

Hate crimes overall climb 4.6 percent