Saturday, 18 November 2017
Latest news
Main » Facebook suggests users upload nudes to avoid revenge porn

Facebook suggests users upload nudes to avoid revenge porn

09 November 2017

Facebook has launched a trial that will see users submit nude photos of themselves in order to prevent the circulation of "revenge porn" on its network. The Telegraph reported that to provide the photos directly to Facebook, users should send them through the Messenger app.

In the Australian pilot, users must first complete an online form on the e-safety commissioner's website outlining their concerns.

If someone tries to upload explicit content matching that hash on platforms such as Facebook, Messenger, and Instagram, the company won't allow it.

After you send the photos of yourself, Facebook will use its hashing technologies to create a digital footprint that will prevent others from uploading the same image on the social media platform.

Once that happens, Facebook's analysts "hash" the image, storing a unique fingerprint which prevents further instances being uploaded and shared. If you're afraid a photo of yours might be shared on Facebook by, let's say, a excommunicated ex or a spurned spouse, you share that photo with Facebook, and they block that photo from ever showing up.

First, you upload an explicit image of yourself to Facebook Messenger (you can do so by starting a conversation with yourself).

So if hackers were able to access this information from Facebook, Thompson said all they would see is a bunch of numbers that would be meaningless.

At least that is what Facebook and the Australian government is saying to do in a new test aimed at cutting off potential revenge porn before it happens. The sender is then also recommended to delete the image.

Z slams Meek Mill's 'heavy handed' prison sentence
The 30-year-old was convicted of drug dealing and gun possession in 2008, and received a prison sentence of 11-to-23 months. Louis, Missouri in March for allegedly assaulting two pedestrians, though the charges were later dropped.

Back in May, Facebook announced it was hiring thousands of new employees who will be specifically tasked with monitoring and removing flagged posts.

"Revenge porn" is horrendous enough as it is, without technology companies making the problem worse.

According to a 2016 study by the Data & Society Research Institute, One in 25 Americans has been a victim of threats or posts of almost nude or nude images without their permission.

Facebook is taking drastic steps to stop revenge porn.

Will Facebook in the US get this technology?

"With its billions of users, Facebook is one place where many offenders aggress because they can maximize the harm by broadcasting the nonconsensual porn to those most close to the victim".

Facebook is launching a new program and is asking people to send some intimate images - all in an effort to keep the photos from getting out.

Facebook suggests users upload nudes to avoid revenge porn